Semester Courses

 

Semester Courses Open to the Public

 

Each semester, the Boston Graduate School of Psychoanalysis opens its classroom doors to the public for a semester long experience. Click here to apply now.


Offered Spring 2017.


Modern Perspectives in Psychoanalysis
Instructor: Dr. William Sharp

This course introduces students to a modern psychoanalysis by exploring how we understand people and how we work with patients.  We examine elementary concepts related to what drives us, how we form relationships, how our characters develop, dreams, and the therapeutic interaction. We will also explore specific methods for working with psychotic, violent, and addiction-ridden patients.

Schedule: Classes will run 12 weeks on a mainly every-other-week, two-credit schedule, starting February. Class meetings are Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 p.m. Feb 8, Feb 22, Mar 8, Mar 15, Mar 22, Apr 5, Apr 19, May 3, May 10, May 17, May 31, Jun 14.

Enroll either for academic credit or on a continuing education basis.

Cost: $1420 for academic credit (2 credits) | $610 for non-credit | additional $40 for Continuing Education Credit | add $50 registration fee in any case

Semester Courses


Conflicts in Adulthood
Instructors: Ms. Katherine Morrell

This course identifies the central developmental tasks and inherent conflicts typical of adulthood. The course begins with typical struggles of young adults, including the repetition of early longings and the fear of intimacy. The course goes on to address love, guilt and shame as they relate to conflicts around intimacy and aggression and the efforts individuals engage in to make successful relationships and attain individual identities. We also explore the implications of theory and research for clinical work.

Schedule: Classes will run 12 weeks on a mainly every-other-week, two-credit schedule, starting February. Class meetings are Friday 3:00-5:00 p.m. Feb 10, Feb 24, Mar 10, Mar 17, Mar 24, Apr 7, Apr 21, May 5, May 12, May 19, Jun 2, Jun 16.

Enroll either for academic credit or on a continuing education basis.

Cost: $1420 for academic credit (2 credits) | $610 for non-credit | additional $40 for Continuing Education Credit | add $50 registration fee in any case

Semester Courses


The Cultural and Dynamic Analysis of Emotion
Instructor: Dr. Jon Dzitko

What are emotions? Are emotions universal experiences, the product of an evolutionary process that designed to fulfill certain functions, or are they culturally particular domains, reflective of the unique experiences of different social worlds? How do different cultures experience and articulate shame? Could guilt, shame, and embarrassment be considered as mechanisms of social control?  Emotions shape our lives in substantial ways but there is an enigmatic quality about them.   In this course, we will present emotions as an elusive but a most integral aspects of human life. We will spend a good amount of time on reconstructing and understanding emotion as lived experience in the daily lives of individuals—thus within the micro-contexts of interactions, identities, social relationships and communities. We will examine emotion within the scientific discourse of three major fields of inquiry: sociology of emotions, anthropology of emotions, and political affect theory.

Schedule: Classes will run 12 weeks on a mainly every-other-week, two-credit schedule, starting February. Class meetings are Friday 5:00-7:00 p.m. Feb 10, Feb 24, Mar 10, Mar 17, Mar 24, Apr 7, Apr 21, May 5, May 12, May 19, Jun 2, Jun 16.

Enroll either for academic credit or on a continuing education basis.

Cost: $2130 for academic credit (3 credits) | $610 for non-credit | additional $40 for Continuing Education Credit | add $50 registration fee in any case

Semester Courses


Culture, Political Subjectivity and the Global Rise of Populist Authoritarianism
From Russia to Turkey and Europe to the United States and elsewhere across the globe, the last two decades have witnessed the rising wave of a new species of political authoritarianism.  In addition to a basic right wing rhetoric, the strongmen (and strongwomen) leading these moves often also express a strong sense of nostalgia and promise a zealous agenda of reclaiming one glorious past or another, and they generally warn their people of imminent threats to their prosperity or even to their very existence, which they attribute to globalization.  How are we to make sense of the consistent pattern of rise in right wing, populist authoritarianism around the globe, from a psychoanalytic point of view?  More specifically, how are we to understand and theorize the cultural and psychological dynamics that underlie this global anti-globalization development?  What are the local, clinical and personal implications of this phenomenon?  And in what direction may these movements be leading the global community?  In this course we will address the above questions and more, using insights from traditional and contemporary psychoanalytic theory and cultural anthropology, as well as poststructuralist conceptualizations of power and recent theories of political subjectivity.

Schedule: Classes will run 12 weeks on a mainly every-other-week, two-credit schedule, starting February. Class meetings are Friday 3:00-5:00 p.m. Feb 10, Feb 24, Mar 10, Mar 17, Mar 24, Apr 7, Apr 21, May 5, May 12, May 19, Jun 2, Jun 16.

Enroll either for academic credit or on a continuing education basis.

Cost: $2130 for academic credit (3 credits) | $610 for non-credit | additional $40 for Continuing Education Credit | add $50 registration fee in any case

Semester Courses


 

 


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